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  1. #1
    IncGamers Member TheFarxy's Avatar
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    when diablo 3 is out BEAWARE there are ppl that likes to steal ur items.

    It is perhaps not uncommon to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of obtaining the best. Competition can be healthy and be fun, but it is also a pristine opportunity for thieves to get your information. Remember, when describing information it is meant towards obtaining your items and accounts. In light of diablo 3 is soon here, this article is to help protect you and your hard earned information. Please note that this is for educational purposes only to safe guard against thieving tactics.

    What You Need to Know
    First and foremost, Blizzard will never ask for your account items, or passwords. They do not need them because they already have access once installed/created/registered. Anyone impersonating (claiming) to be a Blizzard representative or scamming should be reported to hacks@blizzard.com. You may also use the Blizzard web report tool to report and obtain what is needed when reporting at https://us.battle.net/support/en/ticket/submit
    Secondly, Blizzard does not replace lost or stolen items. There would be too much traffic with claims, so once they are gone, they are gone. If you think this is unfair, try to think of it this way: how would you feel if you traded and legitimately obtained an item (or account) from someone, but all of sudden it is gone because a user claimed it was not a legitimate trade? Or how would you like dealing with hundreds of two party complaints of one saying they did trade/give the item and the other claiming they didn’t? Even worse, you make the wrong decision restoring an item to a user who simply did not like what they gave/traded. (RMAH will make this abit better. and blizzard might take action this time becouse of it, but it will take time)

    Lastly these scams typically do not require the use of third party programs. This adds to the difficulty on Blizzard’s end to determine if it was legitimate or not. It is also not uncommon for these scams to be used in combination.

    Web/Email Scams

    Voting/Nominations: Scammers may try to have you vote for them or register to get a reward, or to become a part of their clan, or to gain something free. This “voting” or “registration" may come in email or website form trying to have you give them your information. Beware and avoid voting with registering your information (especially beyond an account). A clan should not require a cd-key or account password.

    Download This: Usually done by an email attachment (sometimes referred to a website) by having you download something with promise of a reward such as an account, item, program, etc. Unfortunately this download turns out to be a virus, keylogger, or bot, which can give them your information, and even compromise your computer resources. Some of these bots are specific enough that you will not be able to exit or stop its movements. If this happens, do a hard (push and hold the power button) shut off of your computer, clean your computer (at least delete temp files and internet history/cookies/temp files), run your protection software, and then assess the damage.

    Fake Blizzard: An attempt to make an email seem like it is legitimately from Blizzard. The contents will be along the lines that you are in trouble or your account did not register and you need to complete the appropriate registration. Please ensure it is actually from Blizzard and then check any URL (link) by observing the address in the lower left corner to see if it is taking you to a legitimate website. You may also call Blizzard to see if they had indeed sent you anything.

    Chat Scams

    DND: Stands for Do Not Disturb and is a chat command that informs those that whisper you to why not to disturb. So, if you did, “/dnd accountname is bob and password is sue” then that is what will be displayed when whispered. If you /dnd command again then the message will no longer display. (this was a scam way in D2, in diablo 3. they might use some thing close to this.)

    Blizzard Says: Usually done by portraying that they are an authority, a Blizzard Representative. This usually coincides with trying to obtain your password...or else (claim you could be banned)! Remember Blizzard does not need your password or cd-key. Also their text is blue and their icon is a fully armored male with a blue cape.

    Want my Account: This is an offer for a free account claiming they no longer want to play. The attempt is to have you give your account password and they will immediately attempt to log on. This can be done in games, chat rooms, and even websites. Remember to offer a different password.

    Game Scams

    Its Me...Whoever: This scam is done by trying to get you to believe you know them. They may try to goad you to reveal an earlier friends account name (who they claim they are) in attempts to get you to loan them items, use your account, etc. Some may even try to drag this out for days, some might even go months. Be careful who you trust in loaning your information. (with real id, battle tag this way IS VERY MUCH a problem in D3.)

    Trust for: Usually done in promise of a better item(s), account, initiation into a clan, etc. One or more people may be in on the scam (could be the entire clan). The idea is you have to drop an item, stand, or walk away without picking it up. The others may be able to pick it up and then drop it. The first or even the second item may not be taken in hopes of a better item each drop. The goal is to get you comfortable and once satisfied the item(s) is taken.

    Dupe Your Items: It might be possible, but unlikely any user advertising can do so. Scammers may try to demonstrate [/sarcasm) the dupe method of a lower item (such as – arrow, gem or even a simple item, or a unique item). Really, they already had the item in possession and typically use items where their stats do not change. Then they try to have you give them a quality item (unique, rare, high lvl gem, etc.) and leave. Do not give your items unless they are intended to be free. (lets hope dupes are out of D3, but there will be ppl that try and scam you like this.)

    Drop It: Certain items may allow only one in possession and may not be traded in the trade window (they may only be viewed). Scammers will try to get you to trade by dropping an item standing outside of them being physically seen. This scam is done both inside and outside of town. Counting is usually involved and then the item is not there or it was not what was agreed upon trade. It could even be the same item, but severely lower than what you originally saw. For example, they showed you a perfect windforce and when you pick it up, the stats are heavily adjusted. (allways use the trade system, as far as we know there will not be any items that its uniq(only 1 on each hero) like : Annilus, Gheeds, and Hellfire Torch from D2.)

    The Walls: This is where a scammer will try to get you to stand in a specific spot and have you drop the item. They will try to get you to stand near a wall, edge, inside a building, or some area that the item has a chance to drop on the other side or in a position where they can get it before you can. USE THE INGAME TRADE.

    Bait and Switch This is probably one of the oldest scams in the Diablo world. Essentially this involves a scammer initially showing an item to trade in the trade window. The scammer’s inventory is full, they say they need room, or they are in a hurry. Once you put your offer backup they will put the item’s image in the trade window and click the trade button. Come to find out that it is not the same item. For example, they may even give you the item, but it now has lower stats. Make sure you take your mouse cursor over the item carefully ensuring this is the item you agreed to trade for BEFORE clicking the Accept trade button.

    Miscellaneous

    Sockets: The idea of this is to boost certain item’s features by adding a gem, jewel, or rune. It might make it to look too good to be true. This method is not really a scam, but could be done with other scams. Please be sure to look at the item carefully.

    Buy it for Me: Usually this involves more than one scammer. It will look something like that Scammer A has the item Scammer B wants, but Scammer A won’t sell. Scammer B is offering to overpay for the item. So, you trade with Scammer A and are successful, but traded some generally good items for a common, or even basic item…essentially, you overpaid. Both leave and you are stuck with the item.

    D2jsp - forum gold : this was a good way of tradeing back in the diablo 2 prime days, as it worked back then. now the mods/ppl that run this site are corrupt and steals as well, i did go back here to trade D3 related stuff. and got scamed by a high ranked mod. (we where 6 ppl that got scamed at the same time, and all the forum gold was given to him) and they even closed my account as i could show some prof, paypal cant pay you back - but visa can. make sure you pay with visa if you use D2JSP (Warning DONT use D2jsp, blizzards fee for RMAH is not that high.)

    thanks to Bobertith.



  2. #2
    IncGamers Member
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    Re: when diablo 3 is out BEAWARE there are ppl that likes to steal ur items.

    Ignore any e-mail you think might be from Blizzard. When in doubt, delete the e-mail anyway, and log into your battle.net account by typing us.battle.net (or eu.battle.net or whatever) into your browser's address bar - If what the e-mail said was true, you'll sure notice it when you log in and go to your account settings. Never click any links or believe anything you see in your e-mail inbox.

    That should at least keep you safe from any spam-mail-related scams.




  3. #3
    IncGamers Member starrise's Avatar
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    Re: when diablo 3 is out BEAWARE there are ppl that likes to steal ur items.

    What galzohar said bears repeating:

    Fundamental rule of email from companies with whom you do business: never click links in emails, ever. There is no reason to ever click or copy a link in email. Not clicking links completely shuts down email-based phishing scams.

    Always go to the parent site by manually typing it in (or using a bookmark you made from the parent site) and checking out what they have to say using that website. If you're still doubtful, email their customer support directly from the website, then you'll get a support ticket number and can follow a trustworthy email thread (in terms of security).



  4. #4
    IncGamers Member Raesene's Avatar
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    Re: when diablo 3 is out BEAWARE there are ppl that likes to steal ur items.

    There is a lot of useful advice here. I especially like how you covered a few of the "social engineering" type scams. If you're performing a trade outside of the auction house, you really need to be careful that you are getting what you expect from the transaction, and that the value you are trading is fair.

    It may sound cliche, but the adage applies: If a deal seems too good to be true, it probably is.

    Con artists are skilled at playing against the greed of their marks.



  5. #5
    IncGamers Member
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    Re: when diablo 3 is out BEAWARE there are ppl that likes to steal ur items.

    its written BEAVERe
    sorz, couldnt help



  6. #6
    D3 Monk Moderator kestegs's Avatar
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    Great stuff, thanks farxy!

    I would also recommend setting up an authenticator if you haven't yet. That will save you on the password hacking stuff at least.



  7. #7
    IncGamers Member beingmused's Avatar
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    Re: when diablo 3 is out BEAWARE there are ppl that likes to steal ur items.

    Even if you did all of that your security would still be quite lax. Here are some of the dangers to your account that you did not explore, and my solutions to them:

    - They now have the technology to mimic the voices of your family and friends...whenever someone you "know" calls you up but you cannot see their face, it is most likely a hacker trying to suss out personal information so they can guess your passwords. Hang up on them immediately!

    - Fingerprints can be used to unlock access to your most legendary of legendaries. Wear gloves 24/7.

    - Most long legal contracts and terms of service agreements contain hidden language (tucked away in between pledges to the Illuminati) that entitle the company to ownership of your digital assets. That's why I sign all documents with the fake name "Tikcus Naclabac Dlroweht", which is backwards for "the world cabal can suck it".

    - Homeless people are often times Feds in disguise! Stay away from them.

    - People will use your biological information to steal your identity. Never throw away anything, and keep your waste stored in jars! The toilet is just a way to literally flush your hard-won items down the toilet.



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