Latest Diablo 3 News
DiabloWiki Updates
Page 4 of 28 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 277
  1. #31
    IncGamers Member llad12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Sooner State
    Posts
    6,189
    Quote Originally Posted by Bortaz
    I caught about 5 minutes of a story about this last night on tv. Seems it's been going on since at least the Carter administration. Sometime in the 70s, a secret court was set up for this specific thing, apparently. I wonder if what Shrub is doing is any different.


    EDIT: Before Ilad's backlash ensues, let me go ahead and say that I don't yet know anything about this subject, and could have misinterpreted what I saw.
    The 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, passed after the intelligence community came under fire for spying on Americans during the Nixon era, gives government — with approval from a secretive U.S. court — the authority to conduct covert wiretaps and surveillance of suspected terrorists and spies.


    Bush has bypassed said court since 2002.

    WASHINGTON, Dec. 15th - Months after the Sept. 11 attacks, President Bush secretly authorized the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on Americans and others inside the United States to search for evidence of terrorist activity without the court-approved warrants ordinarily required for domestic spying, according to government officials.
    NYT

    Amazingly, when confronted with this information, Bush lashed out today at those who revealed this information and, furthermore, arrogantly stated that he will continue to break the law.

    Say what you like ... it appears to me that King George II just said "**** you" to the New York Times, the Senate, and the Constitution of the United States of America.

    Some say it's not the first time ...




  2. #32
    Banned Bortaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Por la frontera con México.
    Posts
    11,496
    Quote Originally Posted by llad12
    The 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, passed after the intelligence community came under fire for spying on Americans during the Nixon era, gives government — with approval from a secretive U.S. court — the authority to conduct covert wiretaps and surveillance of suspected terrorists and spies.


    Bush has bypassed said court since 2002.



    NYT

    Amazingly, when confronted with this information, Bush lashed out today at those who revealed this information and arrogantly stated that he will continue to break the law.

    Thanks for the info.




  3. #33
    IncGamers Member llad12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Sooner State
    Posts
    6,189
    Have you heard the BS Condi Rice spewed to Tim Russert today on Meet the Press? It is laughable.

    We are a nation of laws. President Bush broke the law. He is trampling over our constitutionally-guaranteed civil liberties as we speak.

    The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized ... Amendment IV - US Constitution
    Where is the outrage? This matter strikes at the very heart of our government. It should be of concern to everyone regardless of their political leaning.

    Where are our OTF right-wing pundits on this issue? Their silence is deafening.




  4. #34
    Banned Bortaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Por la frontera con México.
    Posts
    11,496
    Quote Originally Posted by llad12
    Have you heard the BS Condi Rice spewed to Tim Russert today on Meet the Press? It is laughable.

    We are a nation of laws. President Bush broke the law. He is trampling over our constitutionally-guaranteed civil liberties as we speak.



    Where is the outrage? This matter strikes at the very heart of our government. It should be of concern to everyone regardless of their political leaning.

    Where are our OTF right-wing pundits on this issue? Their silence is deafening.
    I am concerned about this, yes.




  5. #35
    IncGamers Member Stevinator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    chicagoland
    Posts
    5,003
    Quote Originally Posted by llad12
    Have you heard the BS Condi Rice spewed to Tim Russert today on Meet the Press? It is laughable.

    We are a nation of laws. President Bush broke the law. He is trampling over our constitutionally-guaranteed civil liberties as we speak.



    Where is the outrage? This matter strikes at the very heart of our government. It should be of concern to everyone regardless of their political leaning.

    Where are our OTF right-wing pundits on this issue? Their silence is deafening.
    I don't consider myself a right wing pudit, but I know you do. I've already said I don't like the idea that my government can spy on me. I feel a little better after listening to this (from the link someone else posted) but i still don't like it. I just know that it's being done in secret.




  6. #36
    IncGamers Member llad12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Sooner State
    Posts
    6,189
    Quote Originally Posted by Stevinator
    I don't consider myself a right wing pudit, but I know you do.
    If I recall correctly, you are a Libertarian and should be quite concerned, therefore, about such matters.


    Quote Originally Posted by Stevinator
    I've already said I don't like the idea that my government can spy on me. I feel a little better after listening to this (from the link someone else posted) but i still don't like it. I just know that it's being done in secret.
    I posted that Condi video link to Crooks and Liars.

    Tell me Steve, in what way does it make you feel a little better? Nothing has been done. The illegal, unauthorized-court surveillance of American citizens continues on ... even as we speak.

    The Bush administration is continuing its assault on Americans' privacy and freedom in the name of the war on terrorism.

    First, in 2002, according to extensive reporting in The New York Times on Friday, it secretly authorized the National Security Agency to intercept and keep records of Americans' international phone and e-mail messages without benefit of a previously required court order. Second, it has permitted the Department of Defense to get away with not destroying after three months, as required, records of American Iraq war protesters in the Pentagon's Threat and Local Observation Notice, or TALON, database ...

    The White House needs to tell the Pentagon promptly to destroy the records of protesters as required, within three months. It also needs promptly to tell the NSA to return to following the rules, to get the approval of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court before monitoring Americans' communications. The idea that all of this is being done to us in the name of national security doesn't wash; that is the language of a police state. Those are the unacceptable actions of a police state.
    Pittsburgh Post Gazette




  7. #37
    IncGamers Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    2,551
    Looks like Emperor Palpatine got his fingers caught in the cookie jar again.

    One reporter asked whether the NSA was extrajudicially spying on anti-war groups. Amazingly, the White House gave no comment.

    Holy crap. It's Nixon all over again.




  8. #38
    IncGamers Member Dondrei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In my pants
    Posts
    36,857
    Quote Originally Posted by jimmyboy
    Holy crap. It's Nixon all over again.
    But Nixon wasn't a crook...




  9. #39
    IncGamers Member llad12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Sooner State
    Posts
    6,189
    In case someone is interested: the following are criminal sanctions for violations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act:

    (a) Prohibited activities

    A person is guilty of an offense if he intentionally—

    (1) engages in electronic surveillance under color of law except as authorized by statute; or

    (2) discloses or uses information obtained under color of law by electronic surveillance, knowing or having reason to know that the information was obtained through electronic surveillance not authorized by statute.

    (b) Defense

    It is a defense to a prosecution under subsection (a) of this section that the defendant was a law enforcement or investigative officer engaged in the course of his official duties and the electronic surveillance was authorized by and conducted pursuant to a search warrant or court order of a court of competent jurisdiction.

    (c) Penalties

    An offense described in this section is punishable by a fine of not more than $10,000 or imprisonment for not more than five years, or both.

    (d) Federal jurisdiction

    There is Federal jurisdiction over an offense under this section if the person committing the offense was an officer or employee of the United States at the time the offense was committed.
    Cornell Law School




  10. #40
    IncGamers Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    5,730
    If he truly said those things about the Constitution, it's sickening.

    I understand the reasoning behind domestic spying, but I don't understand why he would disregard a secret court about the matter, since it would net the same results anyway. But I suppose a lot of things in this world don't make sense. :Shrug:




Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •